Pages 130 – 137 of the Mueller report TL;DR Manafort was pursuing his interests by attempting to use his position as the Trump Campaign Chairman to settle previous debts he had incurred with a Russian oligarch.

Per Pages 130 – 137 of the report;[1]

TL;DR Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort was pursuing his interests by attempting to use his position in the campaign to settle previous debts he had incurred with a Russian oligarch. The Mueller report confirmed that Trump campaign chairman and deputy chairman Manafort and Gates were sharing sensitive, internal polling data with an operative Rick Gates thought was a spy.

The Office could not reliably determine Manafort’s purpose in sharing internal polling data with Kilimnik during the campaign period. Manafort [redacted] did not see a downside to haring campaign information, and told Gates that his role in the Campaign would be “good for bussiness” and potentially a way to be made whole for work he previously completed in Ukraine. As to Deripaska, Manafort claimed that by sharing campaign information with him, Deripaska might see value in their relationship and resolve a “disagreement” – a reference to one or more outstanding lawsuits. Because of questions about Manafort’s credibility and our limited ability to gather evidence on what happened to the polling data after it was sent to Kilimnik, the Office could not assess what Kilimnik (or others he may have given it to) did with it. The Office did not identify evidence of a connection between Manafort’s sharing polling data and Russia’s intereference in the election, which had already been reported by U.S. media outlets at the time of the August 2 meeting. The investigation did not establish that Manafort otherwise coordinated with the Russian government on its election-interference efforts.

…Gates also reported that Manafort instructed him in April 2016 or early May 2016 to send Kilimnik Campaign internal polling and other updates so that Kilimnik, in turn, could share it with Ukrainian oligarchs. Gates understood that the information would also be shared with Deripaska, [redacted]. Gates reported to the Office that he did not know why Manafort wanted him to send polling information, but Gates thought it was a way to showcase Manafort’s work, and Manafort wanted to open doors to jobs after the Trump Campaign ended. Gates said that Manafort’s intruction included sending internal polling data prepared for the Trump Campaign by pollster Tony Fabrizio. Fabrizio had worked with Manafort for years and was brought into the Campaign by Manafort. Gates states that, in accordance with Manafort’s instruction, he periodically sent Kilimnik polling data via WhatsApp; Gates then deleted the communications on a daily basis. Gates further told the Office that, after Manafort left the Campaign in mid-August, Gates sent Kilimnik polling data less frequently and that the data he sent was more publicly available information and less internal data.

Gate’s account about polling data is consistent [redacted] with multiple emails that Kilimnik sent to U.S. associates and press contacts between late July and mid-August of 2016. Those emails reference “internal polling,” described the status of the Trump Campaign and Manafort’s role in it, and assess Trump’s prospects for victory. Manafort did not acknowledge instructing Gates to send Kilimnik internal data, [redacted].

The Office also obstained contemporaneous emails that shed light on the purpose of the communications with Deripaska and that are consistent with Gates’s account. For example in response to a July 7, 2016 email from a Ukrainian reporter about Manafort’s failed Deripaska-backed investment, Manafort asked Kilimnik whether there had been any movement on “this issue with our friend.” Gates states that “our friend” likely referred to Deripaska, and Manafort told the Office that the “issue” (and “our biggest interest,” as stated below) was a solution to the Deripaska-Pericles issue. Kilimnik replied:

I am carefully optimistic on the question of our biggest interesting.

Our friend [Boyarkin] said there is lately significantly more attention to the campaign in his boss’ [Deripaska’s] mind, and he will be most likely looking for ways to reach out to you pretty soon, understanding all the time sensitivity. I am more than sure that it will be resolved and we will get back to the original relationship with V.’s boss [Deripaska]

Eight minutes later, Manafort replied that Kilimnik should tell Boyarkin’s “boss,” a reference to Deripaska, “that if he needs private briefings we can accommodate.” Manafort has alleged to the Office that he was willing to brief Deripaska only on public campaign matters and gave an example: Why Trump selected Mike Pence a the Vice-Presidential running mate. Manafort said he never gave Deripaska a briefing. Manafort noted that if Trump won, Deripaska would want to use Manafort to advance whatever interests Deripaska had in the United States and elsewhere.


1) Department of Justice – Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In the 2016 Presidential Election

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